Pumpkin Pecan Pie
SUMMARY – Two holiday favorites, pumpkin and pecan pie, together in a contrast of flavor and texture. Great sweet balance. This pie will not disappoint either pumpkin or pecan pie purists.

rolled-crustTo be honest, I was a little concerned about this pie. Especially because opinion on a proper pumpkin pie runs strongly in my house.

placed-crustMy mother makes Mrs. Eisenhower’s pumpkin chiffon pie. So did my maternal grandmother, so did my aunt, so does my cousin, so does my second cousin. It’s light, airy and not baked. Mom layers on the whipped cream and it’s the Cadillac of pumpkin pie.

chopped-pecansHowever, the other members of my household strongly believe that baked pumpkin custard pie is proper pumpkin pie. They will not be dissuaded in their opinion (however wrong it happens to be). I feel sorry for them, sad misguided creatures.

pecan-caramel

The first time I had baked pumpkin pie, I was 5 years old, celebrating Thanksgiving in kindergarten. I looked at this dry, flat, over-baked slice of something vaguely pumpkin tasting, without the proper enveloping blanket of whipped cream, and declared that this wasn’t pumpkin pie. And discovered I was a lone voice of reason in a sea of bland pumpkin pie eaters.

pecan-layer

Sadly, out in the world of other people with different family pie traditions, I continue to be the minority voice in what actually constitutes proper pumpkin pie.

cooking-pumpkin

I will make baked pumpkin pie on Thanksgiving, since I am the outvoted minority voice. And because, apparently, pumpkin chiffon pie isn’t actually pie at all, To which, I argue, than what precisely is banana cream or chocolate cream pie? The argument continues …

pumpkin-processingAnyway, I usually bake Rose’s Great Pumpkin Pie recipe from the Pie and Pastry Bible. It’s a good compromise, since the pumpkin is super-smooth, and if you chill it long enough and put enough whipped cream on it, the texture is as close as I can get a custard pumpkin pie to the chiffon pumpkin pie. And it is a proper, baked pie. The sacrifices I make *sniff*.

pie-ready-oven

Now add pecan to this already opinionated crew of pie purists. I was afraid it wouldn’t end well.

pie-baked-1

So I brought the pie to my MS support group on Wednesday, Thanksgiving eve and let them have it.

pie-baked-2

They LOVED it. Lori, the facilitator, wanted to eat the whole pie, she enjoyed it so much. I had a piece and it was really, really good.

pie-finished-1

The pumpkin was creamy and smooth, like the pumpkin in the Great Pumpkin Pie. Almost as light as the chiffon pie. The pecan layer was caramel-ly, crunchy and sticky, like a good pecan pie. The combination was balanced and not cloyingly sweet.

pie-finished-2I brought the rest of the pie home. And, surprise! It was a big hit. It seriously didn’t last. I am partially at fault for that. I didn’t even have a chance to take a picture of a slice.

This pie may make it on the Thanksgiving menu next year. And everyone will be thankful.


This post is part of the Alpha Bakers bake-along. It’s an online project where a group of food bloggers bake our way through The Baking Bible by Rose Levy Beranbaum.

Most of the recipes made during this project will not be shared. If you see something amazing and want to know about the recipe please let me know. You might want to get the book for yourself, or at least check it out from your local library before deciding.

Marble in Reverse Bundt Cake from The Cake Bible - the usual mostly yellow with chocolate marble is flipped on its head in this bundt cake. Heat and convection give it great stripes without marbling the batters together.

Marble in Reverse Bundt Cake-blog-header

SUMMARY – the usual mostly yellow with chocolate marble is flipped on its head in this bundt cake. Heat and convection give it great stripes without marbling the batters together.

From My Big Fat Greek Wedding:

Maria Portokalos: It’s a cake! I know! Thank you! Thank you very, very much.
[whispering to Aunt Freida]
Maria Portokalos: There’s a hole in this cake!

melted-chocolate

I think if Mrs. Miller had brought this cake to the Portokalos house, they might have been more impressed! Of course it may have been overshadowed by the roast lamb on a spit, baklava and ouzo.

wet-ingredientsI certainly liked this cake.

dry-ingredients

The batter was smooth and creamy and tasty both with and without the chocolate.

adding-butter

But was messed me up a bit was the layering.

yellow-batter

I wasn’t clever like Marie and put the pan on the scale to measure out the batter.

adding-chocolate

And it took me forever to spread the different batter layers out.

ready-to-assemble

I got nervous because Rose said to be quick. I wasn’t so quick!

first-batter-layer

I ended up with not enough chocolate batter at the top. Or the bottom?

adding-layersThe cake came out great anyway!

last-layer

The layering was really beautiful – I thought I had messed it up. But it worked!

whole-bundt

I brought some to the neighbors and over to the corner store. Everyone was very appreciative.

piece-of-cake

I will make this again. But I will try these in my mini-bundt pans. I’ll just put the batter in pastry bags.

cut-bundt-cake

This post is part of the Alpha Bakers bake-along. It’s an online project where a group of food bloggers bake our way through The Baking Bible by Rose Levy Beranbaum.

Most of the recipes made during this project will not be shared. If you see something amazing and want to know about the recipe please let me know. You might want to get the book for yourself, or at least check it out from your local library before deciding.